LONDON in 3 DAYS

SEE THE MAP

DAY 1: (The City 1/2)

 

 

 

 

Morning:

 

 

Westminster Abbey 

More...

Gothic church, former benedictine monastery, was built in 950 AD. Since 1066 is the official location for kings/queens coronations (royal church).

Westminster Cathedral 

More..

Not to be confused with Westminster Abbey. This church is the “mother church of Roman Church of England and Wales”. Quite recent (end 1800), built for the Archbishop of church of England.

Buckingham Palace 

More..

Residence and administrative office of the UK monarchy. Was built in 1703 and acquired by the UK monarchy in 1761. Not accessible by the public. One can see through the fences and wait for the guards change (guards mounting – famous ritual – usually 11:00 AM).

St James’s Park 

More..

 One of the three gardens surrounding Buckingham Palace (Royal Parks of London). It has a small lake in the center with a bridge (Blue Bridge) that crosses it (from which Buckingam palace can be seen). Pelicans can often be spotted.
Tips: just behind Buckingham Palace, nice shortcut to have some nature in the city center – familiarise with squirrels

Green Park 

More...

One of the three gardens surrounding Buckingham Palace (Royal Parks of London). Meets with St James’ Park at Victoria Memorial and on the other side with Buckingham Palace Gardens with Wellington Arch. 

Wellington Arch

More...

Built between 1826 and 1830 representing Duke of Wellington originally to honour the British victories during Napoleonic Wars.

 

 

Afternoon:

 

 

Palace of Westminster (parliament)

More...

House of Parliament (both House of Commons and Lords). Rebuilt in 1840 after a huge fire. Perpendicular Gothic Revival style.

Big Ben

More...

Nickname for Great Bell. Unesco World Heritage.

Lambeth Palace

More...

Residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury. Oldest part is from the 1400s.

Victoria Tower Gardens

More...

Gardens on the back which is accessible to the public. Nice spot for some quiet on the river Thames. It’s a Conservation Area from UNESCO.

Walk down “The Queen’s Walk” (South Bank)

More...

Walking promenade between Lambert and Tower Bridge. Established in 1977 for Queen Elizabeth Silver Jubilee. Ideal for relaxing walk and nice shots of London from other perspectives. Many temporary exhibitions of photography and modern art all around.

London Aquarium  (SEA life) & Coca-Cola London Eye
Tips: Family attractions – personally I do not recommend – quite expensive, not great view of London in the end.

Queen Elizabeth Hall

More...

Established in 1967, hosts classical, jazz and avant-garde concerts almost daily, as well as dancing performances. Underneath the buildings you will find the “Undercroft” skate park.

Shakespeare’s Globe 

More...

Reconstruction of the original Shakespeare’s theatre (built in 1599, destroyed in a fire in 1613, rebuilt in 1614 and finally demolished in 1644 ) opened to the public in 1997 – worth to check even just for architecture outside and inside.

Millenium bridge

More...

Pedestrian suspended bridge. Nickname “Wobbly bridge” due to swinging motion on the opening inauguration (June 2000).

St. Paul’s Cathedral

More...

Current structure completed in 1710 but based on previous cathedral from 15th century and even ancient structure (maybe a temple) from around 600 AD.

Barbican Centre district 

More...

Performing art district: exhibitions, concerts, dance.
Tips: Check the district around as well interesting for mix of architecture: modern, middle age, roman.

DAY 2: (The City 2/2)

 

 

 

 

Morning:

 

 

The British Museum

More...

Established in 1753 is one of the largest collections of human history.
Tips: Check the famous Egyptian section – you can see the Rosetta Stone. It’s free as the National Gallery (donation is very welcome) – open from 10 to 17:30.

Hyde Park 
Tips: Walk around and relax – suggested to spend half a day, either morning or afternoon – great for lunch and chill in the nature – start from Hyde park corner (metro station)  or marble arch and walk/bike/run towards Princess Diana Memorial – possibility to rent a boat on the “The Serpentine” small lake inside – great atmosphere during fall.

 

 

Afternoon:

 

 

Kensington Gardens (part of Hyde Park)

More...

Created under Henry the VIII as haunting ground, is one of the Royal Parks of London. It’s part of the larger Hyde Park and includes the elongated lake “Serpentine”.
Tips: Renting a boat might be a nice experience. Check the Princess Diana playground with Peter Pan statue. Take a tea at “The Orangery”.

Kensington Palace 

More...

Royal Residence since the 17th century. Located inside the Kensington Gardens. The State Rooms are open to public and it’s possible to see several paintings/objects from the Royal collection.

Imperial College London (university) 

More...

Established in 1907, it’s dedicated to science, technology, medicine and business.

Natural History Museum 

More...

Established around the 17th century includes large collections of botany, entomology, mineralogy, palaeontology, zoology. Collections of dinosaur skeletons is a must-see.
Tips: Recommended for kids and if interested in science history – buildings around are also interesting for the architecture of red bricks – industrial era.

Victoria and Albert Museum 

More...

Founded in 1852 represents the world’s largest museum of applied and decorative arts from ancient times to Italian Renaissance and contemporary arts. The buildings themselves have interesting architecture from different periods.

 

 

 

 

DAY 3: (REGENT PARK-CAMDEN TOWN-KENSINGTON)

 

 

 

 

Morning:

 

 

The British Library 

More...

The largest national library in UK and one of the largest worldwide (about 200 mln books from all over the world). It’s possible to consult and read in quiet (suggested if you would like a bit of peace and like reading if the weather does not allow you to read outside in a park). Look for the bronze statues here and there. [/learn_more]

King’s Cross 

More...

The station itself is nothing spectacular, however, if you are a Harry Potter fan you should not miss to check out the 9 ¾ platform. In general, the neighborhood around has been recently renovated and home to flourishing cultural movements and establishments (small theatres, concerts area,..).

Camden Town (Camden Lock)

More...

Started in 1970s as a small market on Regent’s Canal is a must visit if you are in London: very eclectic, colorful and somehow weird – check out the buildings and the street performers/murales – watch out during night – check Camden Market.

Regent’s Park 

More...

One of the Royal Park of London. Arranged in two concentric circles you can enjoy Italian Gardens as well as English ones. if possible check the Open Air Theatre (during summer preferably).

Abbey Road Studios (formerly EMI Recordings Studios)

Tips: Since 1929 – must go for music lovers – take the tour inside – (walk on the Beatles white road zebra stripes :))

 

 

Afternoon:

 

 

Thin (Skinny) House 

More...

Thurloe Square – 19th century building originally. Home of artists studios, now expensive apartments. It is actually wedge-shaped (triangle) with only less than 2m wide for the narrowest edge. It creates a nice optical illusion.

How to reach: Walk down in Belgravia and South Kensington districts – rich neighborhood…

Harrods 

More...

Iconic “shopping mall” – must check the Food Hall and Egyptian Room – avoid holiday seasons – always extremely crowded. Established in 1825, saw the involvement of Qatar sovereign funds and linked to Diana’s lover, Dodi Al-Fayed.

Hard Rock Cafe 

More...

Founded in 1971 it’s the first ever Hard Rock cafe – if music lovers it is a must see.
Tips: just look inside for original relics from Led Zeppelin (John Bonham drums at the entrance), Pink Floyd, etc…
 

Other paths in London

No Results Found

The page you requested could not be found. Try refining your search, or use the navigation above to locate the post.